In the Department

  • Did you know that Arabic speaking kids all over the world first acquire a variety of Arabic that is only spoken and does not have any conventional written form? Yet, all Arabic books, including children’s storybooks are written in a different variety of the language called Standard Arabic. This language variety is learnt primarily at school and is remarkably different from the spoken variety in vocabulary and also in phonological, morphological and syntactic structure. It is estimated that only 20% of the words in the spoken lexicon of preschool children exist in an identical form in...

  • Dr. Etti Gordon Ginzburg recently received her Ph.D. at Bar-Ilan for her innovative dissertation project, "From Sense to Nonsense: The Hidden Autobiography of Laura E. Richards," written under the supervision of Prof. Susan Handelman. The dissertation suggests a novel reading of the nonsense poems and two autobiographies of nineteenth-century American children's writer Laura E. Richards (1850-1943). 

    The fact that these works have been barely given any serious scholarly attention, Dr. Ginzburg claims, raises fundamental questions concerning genre, gender and...

  • Joseph Soloveitchik (1903–1993) was a major American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist, philosopher, and theologian, In The Last Rabbi: Joseph Soloveitchik and Talmudic Tradition (Indiana University Press, 2016), Professor William Kolbrener takes on the Soloveitchik’s controversial legacy and shows how he was torn between the traditionalist demands...
  • Sanna Lonfors, a student in the Shaindy Rudoff Creative Writing Program, combines research and creative non-fiction in her M.A. thesis project, "Meine geliebten, goldenen Kinder: Silenced voices from the Holocaust," written under the supervision of Prof. Evan Fallenberg. Sanna's thesis is, as she describes it, "a creative nonfiction work based on authentic letters written in German by two Holocaust victims, as well as letters written by some of their family members. Based on the translated correspondence and various historical sources, museums and databases, my...

  • Yael Shapira's Inventing the Gothic Corpse shows how a series of bold experiments in eighteenth-century British realist and Gothic fiction transform the dead body from an instructive icon into a thrill device. For centuries, vivid images of the corpse were used to deliver a spiritual or political message; today they appear regularly in Gothic and horror stories as a source of macabre pleasure. Yael Shapira’s book tracks this change at it unfolds in eighteenth-century fiction, from the early novels of Aphra Behn and Daniel Defoe, through the groundbreaking mid-century works of...

  • Routledge Journals from the Taylor & Francis Group have recently featured an article written by two of our faculty members  Armon-Lotem and Walters  in collaboration with three of our alumni -- Altman, Burnstein-Feldman, and Yitzhaki  in the series Global Issues: Language, Culture & Identity. The paper "Family language policies, reported language use and proficiency in Russian – Hebrew bilingual children in Israel"...

  • In Open Your Hand: Teaching as a Jew, Teaching as an American (Rutgers University Press, 2018), Ilana Blumberg explores how civic and religious commitments shape the culture of her humanities classrooms, and argues that there is no education without ethics. When we know what sort of society we seek to build, our teaching practices follow.

     
    In vivid classroom scenes from kindergarten through middle school to the university level, Blumberg conveys the drama of intellectual discovery...
  • As part of her current research, Dr. Galit Weidman Sassoon examines the grammatical, conceptual and cognitive basis of linguistic phenomena of gradability, scale structure and vagueness from a theoretical, empirical and experimental perspective. This involves addressing questions such as the following:

    • VaguenessHow many grains of sand make a heap?
    • ...
  • Bruria Miron, an MA student in the Linguistics in Clinical Research program, is interested in Children’s acquisition of adjectives and degree modifiers. In a seminar study, she tried to identify a critical age for the acquisition of Quantity degree modifiers among native Hebrew speaking children. In Hebrew, the quantity words kcat ('little'/'few') and harbe ('much'/'many') can be combined with a word like yoter ('more') in two ways, where the choice...

  • Just out: Decency (Black Lawrence Press, 2015), a new book of poetry by Dr. Marcela Sulak, director of the Shaindy Rudoff Graduate Program in Creative Writing.

    About the book: "Decency celebrates the spunky wenches, the unfortunate queens, the complicated translators, the wistful wives who have been hustled off the spotlit stages of history. Through the lens of Victorian manuals of etiquette, through the unfolding of religion from the Middle East to the American Southwest, Decency thinks...