In the Department

  • Routledge Journals from the Taylor & Francis Group have recently featured an article written by two of our faculty members  Armon-Lotem and Walters  in collaboration with three of our alumni -- Altman, Burnstein-Feldman, and Yitzhaki  in the series Global Issues: Language, Culture & Identity. The paper "Family language policies, reported language use and proficiency in Russian – Hebrew bilingual children in Israel"...

  • Bruria Miron, an MA student in the Linguistics in Clinical Research program, is interested in Children’s acquisition of adjectives and degree modifiers. In a seminar study, she tried to identify a critical age for the acquisition of Quantity degree modifiers among native Hebrew speaking children. In Hebrew, the quantity words kcat ('little'/'few') and harbe ('much'/'many') can be combined with a word like yoter ('more') in two ways, where the choice...

  • Sanna Lonfors, a student in the Shaindy Rudoff Creative Writing Program, combines research and creative non-fiction in her M.A. thesis project, "Meine geliebten, goldenen Kinder: Silenced voices from the Holocaust," written under the supervision of Prof. Evan Fallenberg. Sanna's thesis is, as she describes it, "a creative nonfiction work based on authentic letters written in German by two Holocaust victims, as well as letters written by some of their family members. Based on the translated correspondence and various historical sources, museums and databases, my...

  • Did you know that Arabic speaking kids all over the world first acquire a variety of Arabic that is only spoken and does not have any conventional written form? Yet, all Arabic books, including children’s storybooks are written in a different variety of the language called Standard Arabic. This language variety is learnt primarily at school and is remarkably different from the spoken variety in vocabulary and also in phonological, morphological and syntactic structure. It is estimated that only 20% of the words in the spoken lexicon of preschool children exist in an identical form in...

  • As part of her current research, Dr. Galit Weidman Sassoon examines the grammatical, conceptual and cognitive basis of linguistic phenomena of gradability, scale structure and vagueness from a theoretical, empirical and experimental perspective. This involves addressing questions such as the following:

    • VaguenessHow many grains of sand make a heap?
    • ...
  • Nouns combine with a variety of other elements – determiners, quantifiers, adjectives, relative clauses and more – to form noun phrases. Dr. Gabi Danon's "Noun Phrases" seminar focuses on the structure of such phrases across a wide variety of languages, with the goal of trying to identify significant generalizations that go beyond the seemingly arbitrary restrictions on noun phrase structure in particular languages. Among the questions discussed in this seminar:

    • To what extent is the word...
  • Second language learners often produce language forms resembling those of children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). At present, professionals working in language assessment and education have only limited diagnostic instruments to distinguish language impaired migrant children from those who will eventually catch up with their monolingual peers. A new book titled Assessing Multilingual Children: Disentangling Bilingualism from Language Impairment, edited by...

  • Just out: Decency (Black Lawrence Press, 2015), a new book of poetry by Dr. Marcela Sulak, director of the Shaindy Rudoff Graduate Program in Creative Writing.

    About the book: "Decency celebrates the spunky wenches, the unfortunate queens, the complicated translators, the wistful wives who have been hustled off the spotlit stages of history. Through the lens of Victorian manuals of etiquette, through the unfolding of religion from the Middle East to the American Southwest, Decency thinks...

  • In Victorian Sacrifice: Ethics and Economics in Mid-Century Novels (Ohio State University Press, 2013), Ilana M. Blumberg offers a major reconsideration of the central Victorian ethic of self-sacrifice, suggesting that much of what we have taken to be the moral psychology of Victorian fiction may be understood in terms of the dramatic confrontation between Christian theology and the world of modern economic theory. As Victorian writers Charlotte Mary Yonge, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Anthony...

  • Joseph Soloveitchik (1903–1993) was a major American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist, philosopher, and theologian, In The Last Rabbi: Joseph Soloveitchik and Talmudic Tradition (Indiana University Press, 2016), Professor William Kolbrener takes on the Soloveitchik’s controversial legacy and shows how he was torn between the traditionalist demands...