In the Department

  • South African apartheid sign

    Taught by Dr. Karin Berkman, this course examines South African cultural production between 1948 and 1996, under apartheid rule and in the post-apartheid period. During the course of the semester, the class will read the works of some of South Africa’s most renowned writers, including Alan Paton, Nadine Gordimer, Athol Fugard, Oswald Mtshali, Mongane Wally Serote, Dennis Brutus, Antjie Krog, among others, and analyze diverse literary forms including the novel, the short story, life writing, drama, and poetry. In addition, close attention will be paid to South African film. In order...

  • Dr. Esther Schupak will be teaching a new course that will focus on reading Shakespeare's dramas and poetry in a political context. Of course, in order to arrive at a full understanding of the political aspects of Shakespeare’s work, we need to appreciate the circumstances of censorship that underlay his artistic production. The class will therefore begin by examining Elizabethan and Jacobean censorship and the limits that this practice imposed upon artistic expression, then move on to consider the issue of republicanism in an early modern context, defining...

  • Routledge Journals from the Taylor & Francis Group have recently featured an article written by two of our faculty members  Armon-Lotem and Walters  in collaboration with three of our alumni -- Altman, Burnstein-Feldman, and Yitzhaki  in the series Global Issues: Language, Culture & Identity. The paper "Family language policies, reported language use and proficiency in Russian – Hebrew bilingual children in Israel"...

  • Taught by Prof. Marcela Sulak, the course is predicated on the idea that modernism in the English language is, effectively, a single event occurring nearly simultaneously on both sides of the Atlantic. As the course surveys the major English language works from 1890s-1940s, the instructor and students will avail themselves of the major changes in literary methodology that have occurred over the past few decades – the rise of new modes of literary theory, and new sensitivity to issues of social justice and gendered and racial inclusiveness. 

  • Yael Shapira's Inventing the Gothic Corpse shows how a series of bold experiments in eighteenth-century British realist and Gothic fiction transform the dead body from an instructive icon into a thrill device. For centuries, vivid images of the corpse were used to deliver a spiritual or political message; today they appear regularly in Gothic and horror stories as a source of macabre pleasure. Yael Shapira’s book tracks this change at it unfolds in eighteenth-century fiction, from the early novels of Aphra Behn and Daniel Defoe, through the groundbreaking mid-century works of...